Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Cycling Bunch Cycling Photo Road Rule Riding Two Abreast Road Rule151 VicRoads BeachRoadCyclingNoStoppingZones Community Safety






Riding two abreast Road Rule 151

If riding in the same (lane) please consider other road users and,
if necessary, change to single file to allow drivers to overtake safely.

Tip: When riding two abreast bike riders cannot (as stated) ride more than two abreast in any single marked lane on that road

(unless, as stated, overtaking another bike rider) but may ride more than two abreast across multiple lanes.

VicRoads





Riding two abreast Road Rule 151

Rule: Bike riders must not ride alongside more than one other rider in a single marked lane or on any part of a road that is not a multi-lane road unless the bike rider is overtaking another bike rider.

On multi-lane roads, marked lane (and regardless of whether the road is a multi-lane road or any other sort of road), bike riders in that marked lane must not ride more than 1.5 metres apart.

Tip: When riding two abreast bike riders cannot (as stated) ride more than two abreast in any single marked lane on that road

(unless, as stated, overtaking another bike rider) but may ride more than two abreast across multiple lanes.

If riding in the same please consider other road users and, if necessary, change to single file to allow drivers to overtake safely.

VicRoads

Road Rule 247. Riding in a bicycle lane on a road

The rider of a bicycle riding on a length of road with a bicycle lane designed for bicycles travelling
in the same direction as the rider must ride in the bicycle lane unless it is impracticable to do so.

Lane markings

Rule: A bike rider must use the bicycle lane if there is a bicycle lane on a length of road in the same direction as they are riding
(unless there are obstacles in their way, i.e. parked cars, debris etc).

http://www.vicroads.vic.gov.au/Home/SafetyAndRules/SaferRiders/BikeRiders/RoadRulesAndFines.htm

"There are certainly some operational issues in trying to stop cyclists because they are quite mobile and police are usually on foot or in a car," Supt Hartley said.

"You can't identify the cyclist because there are no registration details on them.

"Most offences a police officer sees wouldn't be stopped or fined because of the factors in trying to stop that cyclist."

The Sunday Telegraph  November 20, 2011



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