Thursday, November 23, 2017

Community Safety Bullying VIDEO #femaleaggression #deathstare Mark Bouris describes the impact of the Female Death Stare "What is your problem?" on Jones & Co SKY News Australia July 12th 2016.



Mark Bouris describes the impact of the Female Death Stare on Jones & Co SKY News Australia July 12th 2016. 

"What is your problem?"

Staring or glaring is indicative of a hostile attitude. Psychology Today defines the subtler female aggression as "Until fairly recently, there were no sounds associated with female aggression -- as if it didn't exist.
It's only in the last decade or so that aggression by the female -- in the form of social or relational aggression -- has been recognized.
The words now associated with female aggressive behavior include: 
excluding, ignoring, teasing, gossiping, secrets, backstabbing, rumor spreading and hostile body language (i.e., eye-rolling and smirking). 
Most damaging is turning the victim into a social "undesirable". 
The behavior and associated anger is hidden, often wrapped in a package seen as somewhat harmless or just a "girl thing". 
The covert nature of the aggression leaves the victim with no forum to refute the accusations 
and, in fact, attempts to defend oneself leads to an escalation of the aggression."



Bullying in the Female World
The Hidden Aggression Behind the Innocent Smile 

Sep 03, 2011







"What is your problem?"

Mark Bouris describes the impact of the Female Death Stare on Jones & Co SKY News Australia July 12th 2016. 


Saturday, November 11, 2017

Community Safety Murder Female Aggression Family Violence Stabbing Man stabbed in Mernda home Melbourne Herald Sun September 30, 2017 Misandry Gender Bias Gender Specific approach to Crime "Would the authorities intervene to protect a Male? A Girl can't hurt anyone" Pete Dowe


Would the authorities intervene to protect a Male?

A Girl can't hurt anyone

Pete Dowe



"...(physical) violence is not gender specific. Whether it’s a man or a woman hitting you, you’re still being hit.”
News.com.au
November 8, 2015




Man stabbed in Mernda home


A WOMAN has been charged with murder after a man was allegedly stabbed to death in Mernda last night.
The 30-year-old is due to appear at the Melbourne Magistrates’ Court today over the incident at Ramez St, in Melbourne’s northeast.
Emergency services were called to the address following reports of a stabbing around 5pm on Friday.
The victim died at the scene and homicide detectives arrested the Mernda woman.
A police spokeswoman last night said the man and his attacker were known to each other.
A neighbour, who asked not to be named, said a caucasian couple and three children lived in the house.




Police investigate a stabbing, which left a man dead in Mernda. Picture: Tim Carrafa





Police at a Mernda house where a man was stabbed. Pictures: Tim Carrafa
A policewoman inside the house in Mernda. Pictures: Tim Carrafa
“They’ve argued every night for the past couple of months,” she said.
“They’re always screaming and slamming doors.”
A husband and wife, who live opposite the couple, said they overhead the pair having a heated argument on Thursday.
“It sounded like a lovers’ tiff,” they said.
“He was yelling ‘open the f---ing door, don’t be a dumb b — ch’.
“Sounded like she locked him out when he went out to get the mail.”




The scene outside a house in Mernda, where a man was stabbed. Pictures: Tim Carrafa
The scene on Ramez St, Mernda. Pictures: Tim Carrafa

The Herald Sun understands the couple’s three children remain in the care of another neighbour.
Forensic detectives began collecting evidence from inside the home just before 8.30pm.
A childproof fence could be seen through a second story window.


http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/law-order/man-stabbed-in-mernda-home/news-story/4788c7ad9c6431d6035ee6aa67d9bd0f?login=1

Thursday, November 9, 2017

Cycling Safety Cycling Safely #bikehelmets Bicycle Network Mandatory Helmet Review Opinion of Jake Olivier, Associate Professor, UNSW Sydney "It is well known from multiple surveys here and abroad that lack of cycling infrastructure and concerns for safety are the reasons people do not cycle" "There is a misconception Australia is alone in bicycle helmet legislation. My colleagues and I count at least 271 country, state, territory, province or city bicycle helmet laws." Jake Olivier Why then ought the Victorian Government seek to increase cycling participation without first providing adequate cycling infrastructure? Pete Dowe and Comment by Pete Dowe


"It is well known from multiple surveys here and abroad that lack of cycling infrastructure and concerns for safety are the reasons people do not cycle"

There is a misconception Australia is alone in bicycle helmet legislation. My colleagues and I count at least 271 country, state, territory, province or city bicycle helmet laws."

Jake Olivier, Associate Professor, UNSW Sydney



The dogma of the goal to increase cycling participation by "Making bike riding easy for everyone" “making it easier for people to take up riding” or the focus on encouraging/ increasing cycling “participation” 
is that it dictates we must have unsafe cycling or people won’t cycle.

So for instance unsafe helmet-less cycling has been put forward by Bicycle Network Victoria 
and the 
Freestyle Cycling Campaign as a means of boosting participation.
If one finds the helmet requirement can be deemed too onerous,
one wonders which other cyclists’ responsibilities could not be deemed a prohibitive disincentive
to “making it easier for people to take up riding”? or the focus on encouraging/ increasing cycling “participation” 
a set of Bike lights?
Fundamental road safety measures
such as risk reduction behaviour,
and the responsibility to show a duty of care to one’s own safety as well as to other road users
can also be deemed a disincentive to
“making it easier for people to take up riding” or the focus on encouraging/ increasing cycling “participation” 
The Freestyle Cycling campaign also deems the requirement to wear a helmet a disincentive to cycling participation because it reminds people of the risks of death, truncation of life and serious injury.
Remaining ignorant as to the risks involved in cycling has therefore also been put forward as a means of "Making bike riding easy for everyone" “making it easier for people to take up riding” or the focus on encouraging/ increasing cycling “participation”

Pete Dowe






Unsafe helmet-less cycling has been put forward to boost cycling participation
 A University of NSW study showed helmets reduced fatal head
injuries by about 65 per cent."...before and after helmet laws, and we found there was no change in the number of people cycling," Dr Jake Olivier
774 ABC 22/9/16
\
The dogma of the goal to increase cycling participation is that it
dictates we must have unsafe cycling or people won’t cycle.

Health and fitness is undermined where exercise is unsafe.
In fact Bicycle Network Victoria has blamed unsafe cycling on the
increase in cycling participation and inadequate cycling infrastructure.
 “To some extent we have become a victim of our own success. The
huge increase in riding is outstripping the provision of decent facilities by the State Government and councils,”

Some women report feeling too intimidated to ride.

Bicycle Network CEO Craig Richards
Herald Sun Feb 23rd 2016

"the fact infrastructure in Melbourne had not kept up with
the huge increase in cycling numbers was a factor in tensions between cyclists and motorists."
Gary Brennan
Bicycle Network Victoria
Herald Sun February 13, 2013
Why then ought the Victorian Government seek to increase cycling
participation without first providing adequate cycling infrastructure?

Pete Dowe

Making bike riding easy for everyone Level 4, 246 Bourke Street Melbourne VIC 3000 234 Crown Street Darlinghurst NSW 2010 210 Collins Street Hobart TAS 7000 Suite 5, 18-20 Cavenagh Street Darwin NT 0800 Freecall: 1800 639 634 bicyclenetwork.com.au 

Bicycle Network Mandatory Helmet Review Opinion of Jake Olivier, Associate Professor, UNSW Sydney 

1. Do you believe it should be mandatory to wear a helmet when riding a bicycle? (If you believe it should be mandatory at some times but not others please describe when.) Yes 2. What’s your reasons for your answer to question one? Before I respond to this question, I would like to give my impressions regarding the motivations and methods used in this review. 1. It is quite reasonable for an organization such as the Bicycle Network (BN) to review their policies and/or advocacy positions. However, why advertise you are reviewing your policies to the media or anyone external to BN? I believe it would be quite rare for any organization to issue a media release and provide interviews to print and television media that they are reviewing their policies. 2. What is the population frame for the survey? Whatever it is, it should be informed by what the surveyors are trying to accomplish. If the purpose is to canvas the opinions of the BN, then the survey should have been restricted to BN members. If BN is trying to canvas opinions of Australian cyclists, then this has not been accomplished for the same reason. As far as I am aware, there was nothing in place to ensure responses were BN members or Australian residents or cyclists or even human (i.e., self-report cannot be validated). 3. It is well known and accepted that online polls lack scientific rigor. This cannot be changed by statistical analysis or restricting the sample of responders. Given these issues and perhaps the wording of the questions, it is unclear what is actually being measured and whether any of the results will be generalizable to any population. The Statistical Society of Australia has raised similar concerns regarding the Australian Marriage Law Postal Survey. Making bike riding easy for everyone Level 4, 246 Bourke Street Melbourne VIC 3000 234 Crown Street Darlinghurst NSW 2010 210 Collins Street Hobart TAS 7000 Suite 5, 18-20 Cavenagh Street Darwin NT 0800 Freecall: 1800 639 634 bicyclenetwork.com.au http://www.statsoc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/17-09-27- Media-Release-Marriage-Equality-Postal-Survey-1.pdf 4. These points invalidate the survey results irrespective of whether they are favorable or unfavorable towards bike helmet legislation. In my view, it is an exercise in motivational reasoning and, at a minimum, propaganda to drum up support for a predetermined change in BN policy. 5. What is an expert? That is truly a difficult question to answer, but it certainly is not someone who wins a popularity contest. It is also not someone who has an opinion on a topic, including those with doctoral degrees but no formal training or established research record on this topic. It is someone who can evaluate the quality of evidence and not just selectively cite data supportive of their opinions. 6. It is well known from multiple surveys here and abroad that lack of cycling infrastructure and concerns for safety are the reasons people do not cycle. So, why have a huge, media-grabbing survey about helmet policy? Why are more important issues not being addressed? 7. If BN change their policy, are they prepared to properly evaluate its impact? What if there is no increase in cycling, yet cycling head injuries/fatalities increase? Will the BN accept the potential consequences of that decision? The reason I support bicycle helmet legislation is because the peer-reviewed research evidence indicates: 1. Bicycle helmets are highly effective at mitigating head, serious head (roughly skull fractures and/or intracranial hemorrhage), fatal head, and facial injury, 2. Helmet wearing rates are low without helmet legislation and high with them, 3. Bicycle helmet legislation is associated with declines in cycling head injury and cycling fatality, and 4. There is no strong evidence supportive of common hypotheses presented by anti-helmet and anti-helmet helmet legislation advocates. These include no clear evidence for risk compensation, helmets increasing angular acceleration, helmet legislation deters cycling, Making bike riding easy for everyone Level 4, 246 Bourke Street Melbourne VIC 3000 234 Crown Street Darlinghurst NSW 2010 210 Collins Street Hobart TAS 7000 Suite 5, 18-20 Cavenagh Street Darwin NT 0800 Freecall: 1800 639 634 bicyclenetwork.com.au helmet legislation is part of the causal pathway for the rise in obesity, or that removing existing helmet legislation will increase cycling or improve population health. Bicycle helmet legislation is supported by professional societies including the Australasian College of Road Safety, the Australian Injury Prevention Network and the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. As an aside, arguments calling for mandatory helmets in cars or for pedestrians are Straw Man arguments. This discussion is about interventions to make cycling safer and not other road users. There are interventions such as lower posted speed limits that benefit all road users, but that is not what is being argued. Additionally, this view implies no measures should be taken to improve cycling safety unless injuries are eliminated for other road users. I find this view to be unethical. I would also like to add that it is not uncommon for public health interventions to be opposed and debated. This is not unique to bicycle helmets or helmet legislation. However, this discussion should revolve around the available evidence and how “better” evidence may be collected if there are knowledge gaps. Instead, I find bike helmets to be less debate about evidence and more about choosing sides, standing one’s ground and ignoring quality evidence that disagrees with a predetermined position. There is a misconception Australia is alone in bicycle helmet legislation. My colleagues and I count at least 271 country, state, territory, province or city bicycle helmet laws. That is, there were at 271 instances across the world where legislators proposed legislation, debated its merit, and decided to move forward with legislation. Countries with bicycle helmet legislation include Argentina, Australia, Austria, parts of Canada, Chile, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, France, Iceland, Israel, Japan, Jersey, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, New Zealand, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, United Arab Emirates and parts of the United States. These laws differ in terms of enforcement and many apply only to children below a certain age. Ten countries have bicycle helmet laws that apply to all ages (Argentina, Australia, some parts of Canada, Chile, Finland, Malta, New Zealand, South Africa, United Arab Emirates, and parts of the United States). There have only been two jurisdictions that have repealed helmet legislation (Mexico City and Bosnia & Herzegovina) and the impacts of these repeals have never been evaluated. The validity of the argument Australia is alone aside, the reader should be aware that appeals to popularity have no logical foundation. Making bike riding easy for everyone Level 4, 246 Bourke Street Melbourne VIC 3000 234 Crown Street Darlinghurst NSW 2010 210 Collins Street Hobart TAS 7000 Suite 5, 18-20 Cavenagh Street Darwin NT 0800 Freecall: 1800 639 634 bicyclenetwork.com.au Below is a list of peer-reviewed articles I have published with colleagues that have informed my position. Many of these papers are available publicly and I am happy to share copies privately. There is also research by others that I would happily point to for any interested reader. 1. Grzebieta RH, Olivier J & Boufous S. (2017) Reducing serious injury from road traffic crashes. Medical Journal of Australia, 207(6): 242-243. 2. Olivier J & Radun I. (2017) Bicycle helmet effectiveness is not overstated. Traffic Injury Prevention, 18: 755-760. 3. Schepers P, Stipdonk H, Methorst R & Olivier J. (2017) Bicycle fatalities: Trends in crashes with and without motor vehicles in The Netherlands. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour,46: 491-499. 4. Olivier J & Creighton P. (2017) Bicycle injuries and helmet use: A systematic review and meta-analysis. International Journal of Epidemiology, 46(1): 278-292. 5. Olivier J, Boufous S & Grzebieta R. (2016) No strong evidence bicycle helmet legislation deters cycling. Medical Journal of Australia, 205(2): 54-55. 6. Boufous S & Olivier J. (2016) Recent trends in cyclist fatalities in Australia. Injury Prevention, 22(4):284-287. 7. Olivier J, Creighton P & Mason CT. (2016) Evidence Bicycle Helmets Mitigate Intracranial Injury is Not Controversial. European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, 42:333-336. 8. Olivier J & Walter SR. (2015) Too much statistical power can lead to false conclusions: A response to Kary (2014). Injury Prevention, 21: 289. 9. Olivier J, Wang JJJ, Walter S & Grzebieta R. (2014) Anti-Helmet Arguments: Lies, damned lies and flawed statistics. Journal of the Australasian College of Road Safety, 25(4): 10-23. 10.Olivier J, Wang JJJ & Grzebieta R. (2014) A systematic review of methods used to assess mandatory bicycle helmet legislation in New Zealand. Journal of the Australasian College of Road Safety, 25(4): 24- 31. 11.Olivier J. (2014) The apparent ineffectiveness of bicycle helmets: A case of selective citation (letter). Gaceta Sanitaria, 28: 254-255. 12.Wang J, Olivier J & Grzebieta R. (2014) Response to ‘Evaluation of New Zealand’s bicycle helmet law’ (letter). New Zealand Medical Journal, 127(1389): 106-108. 13.Olivier J & Walter SR. (2013) Bicycle helmet wearing is not associated with close overtaking: A reanalysis of Walker (2007). PLOS ONE, 8(9): e75424. Erratum in: PLOS ONE, 9(1). Making bike riding easy for everyone Level 4, 246 Bourke Street Melbourne VIC 3000 234 Crown Street Darlinghurst NSW 2010 210 Collins Street Hobart TAS 7000 Suite 5, 18-20 Cavenagh Street Darwin NT 0800 Freecall: 1800 639 634 bicyclenetwork.com.au 14.Bambach MR, Mitchell RJ, Grzebieta RH & Olivier J. (2013) The effectiveness of helmets in bicycle collisions with motor vehicles: A case-control study. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 53: 78-88. 15.Walter SR, Olivier J, Churches T & Grzebieta R. (2013) The impact of compulsory cycle helmet legislation on cyclist head injuries in New South Wales, Australia: A response. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 52: 204-209. 16.Olivier J, Walter SR & Grzebieta RH. (2013) Long term bicycle related head injury trends for New South Wales, Australia following mandatory helmet legislation. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 50: 1128-1134. 17.Olivier J, Churches T, Walter S, McIntosh A & Grzebieta R. (2012) Response to Rissel and Wen, The possible effect on frequency of cycling if mandatory bicycle helmet legislation was repealed in Sydney, Australia: a cross sectional survey (letter). Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 23(1): 76. 18.Poulos RG, Chong SSS, Olivier J & Jalaludin B. (2012) Geospatial analyses to prioritize public health interventions: a case study of pedestrian and pedal cycle injuries in New South Wales, Australia. International Journal of Public Health, 57(3): 467-475. 19.Walter SR, Olivier J, Churches T & Grzebieta R. (2011) The impact of compulsory cycle helmet legislation on cyclist head injuries in New South Wales, Australia. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 43(6): 2064- 2071. 20.Esmaeilikia M, Grzebieta R & Olivier J. (2017) A systematic review on the effects of bicycle helmet legislation on cycling. Proceedings of the 6th Annual International Cycling Safety Conference (extended abstract). 21.Olivier J & Terlich F. (2016) The use of propensity score stratification and synthetic data to address allocation bias when assessing bicycle helmet effectiveness. 2016 IRCOBI Conference Proceedings – International Research Council on the Biomechanics of Injury, IRC-16- 29: 185-193. 22.Olivier J, Grzebieta R, Wang JJJ & Walter, S. (2013) Statistical Errors in Anti-Helmet Arguments. Proceedings of the Australasian College of Road Safety Conference. 23.Wang JJJ, Grzebieta R, Walter S & Olivier J. (2013) An evaluation of the methods used to assess the effectiveness of mandatory bicycle helmet legislation in New Zealand. Proceedings of the Australasian College of Road Safety Conference. 24.Olivier J, Wang JJJ, Walter S & Grzebieta R. (2013) On the use of empirical Bayes for comparative interrupted time series with an application to mandatory helmet legislation. Proceedings of the Australasian Road Safety, Research, Policing and Education Conference. Making bike riding easy for everyone Level 4, 246 Bourke Street Melbourne VIC 3000 234 Crown Street Darlinghurst NSW 2010 210 Collins Street Hobart TAS 7000 Suite 5, 18-20 Cavenagh Street Darwin NT 0800 Freecall: 1800 639 634 bicyclenetwork.com.au 25.Wang JJJ, Walter S, Grzebieta R & Olivier J. (2013) A Comparison of Statistical Methods in Interrupted Time Series Analysis to Estimate an Intervention Effect. Proceedings of the Australasian Road Safety, Research, Policing and Education Conference. 8. Do you provide consent for your opinion to be made public? Yes No 9. If no, are you happy if we say you provided an opinion but didn’t want it made publicly available? Yes No Signed: Jake Olivier Date: 13 October 2017 Please send completed form to craigr@bicyclenetwork.com.au before 5pm, Friday 13 October, 2017.

Community Safety Murder #femaleaggression #stabbing Melbourne woman charged with murder over Abbotsford stabbing abc.net.au/news Nov 1st 2017 #genderspecific approach to #crime #genderbias






Melbourne woman charged with murder over Abbotsford stabbing

Victoria Police Forensic unit work at the scene where a man was stabbed to death by a woman in Abbotsford.
PHOTO 
Police forensic officers at the scene of the stabbing in Abbotsford.
AAP: JOE CASTRO

A Collingwood woman has been charged with the murder of a 38-year-old man in a stabbing incident at Abbotsford, in Melbourne, on Monday night.
The man died in hospital after he was assaulted with an "edged weapon", police said.
The woman, 29, has been charged with murder and a second woman, aged 30 and also from Collingwood, was released from custody.



http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2017-11-01/murder-charge-laid-over-abbotsford-death/9109540?pfmredir=sm



Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Community Safety Murder Female Aggression Stabbing Family Violence Brittney Jade Dwyer jailed for at least 21 years for stabbing murder of grandfather Robert Whitwell Adelaide South Australia The Advertiser November 7, 2017 "A Girl can't hurt anyone" What does a killer look like? #genderspecific approach to #crime #genderbias #misandry "...(physical) violence is not gender specific. Whether it’s a man or a woman hitting you, you’re still being hit.” News.com.au November 8, 2015



"A Girl can't hurt anyone"
What does a killer look like?

#murder #femaleaggression #familyviolence


"...(physical) violence is not gender specific. Whether it’s a man or a woman hitting you, you’re still being hit.”
News.com.au

November 8, 2015



Brittney Jade Dwyer jailed for at least 21 years for stabbing murder of grandfather Robert Whitwell













BRITTNEY Jade Dwyer will serve at least 21 years behind bars for the stabbing murder of her grandfather that was influenced by a horror TV show.
Supreme Court Justice Kevin Nicholson sentenced the 20-year-old to life imprisonment with a non-parole period of 20.5 years for the murder of her 81-year-old grandfather Robert Whitwell at his Craigmore home in Adelaide’s north in August last year.
She also received an additional six months for the home invasion — bringing her total jail term before she becomes eligible for parole to 21 years.
Her friend, Bernadette Burns, was sentenced to life imprisonment with a non-parole period of 13.5 years for the murder, as she was found not to have murderous intent.
Both Dwyer and Burns’ sentences were backdated to mid-2016.





Brittney Dwyer, Robert Whitwell and Bernadette Burns.

Outside court, Mr Whitwell’s brother Geoffrey Whitwell said the sentence was appropriate and it now allowed the family to heal.
“I think the presiding judge did a good job,” he said.
“It has been a difficult time. We support one another and we’re there for one another as a family. We’re just glad it’s all over, we can get closure and let the healing begin.
“You couldn’t get a better brother than Robert — he was truly a gentleman.”
After the duo drove from Queensland, Burns sat in the car outside Mr Whitwell’s home applying her make-up while Dwyer stabbed her grandfather shortly after he had shown her family photos.
The girls were planning on robbing him of his life savings — $111,000, which was hidden in his shed and house.





Brittney Dwyer's mother Tonya leaving the court after the sentencing of her daughter. Picture: Dean Martin/AAP

Justice Nicholson described the offending as “evil” and “abhorrent”, saying it was difficult to determine Dwyer’s capacity for remorse.
“It’s not possible to adequately summarise the enormity of the distress and profound anguish that these members of the Whitwell and Dwyer families have no doubt ... suffered,” he said.
“The whole affair is, of course, a tragedy on two fronts.
“The very same people who have been very badly damaged by the sudden and violent end of Mr Whitwell, who was greatly loved and respected, are simply shattered by the fact it was such a close member of the family who so callously and brutally murdered him.


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Sunday Night: The evil within
“The brutal facts concerning the murder of your grandfather are relatively straightforward, however, why it came about can only be perceived as very complex.
“Plainly, the fact you are the person you are, with a mixed personality disorder with borderline and anti-social traits, must have been highly influential.”
He said Dwyer was influenced by her drug-taking and involvement with a criminal subculture, her poor capacity to empathise, an unnatural interest in violence and seeing people die, and basic greed for money.
“One remains at a loss as to how a young woman ... would do what you did,” he said.
“This murder was brutal, callous, cold-blooded.”





Robert Whitwell's brother Geoffrey leaving the court. Picture: Dean Martin/AAP

Lawyer Craig Caldicott, for Dwyer, described that aspect as “very troubling”.
Her mother Tonya Dwyer has previously said her daughter had an obsession with graveyards and “dark things” which set her on a macabre path.
She said her and friend, Shelby Lee Angie Holmes, both had a fascination with knives and violence in the lead-up to the murder.
“I think they are little bit dark, as in they would do things in cemeteries and go to cemetery tours and dark things,” Ms Dwyer said.
“There were some things with blood and knives. I think they had a bit of an obsession with some dark stuff.”
Dwyer pleaded guilty to the murder one month after her arrest, while Burns pleaded guilty to murder without intent, which has the same maximum and mandatory minimum, in August 2017.


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Brittney Dwyer motivated in part by a TV show
In April 2016, Dwyer and Holmes drove almost 2000km from Queensland to Adelaide to rob Mr Whitwell.
As Holmes was checking out the house, she sent text messages to Dwyer. One said: “He said hey to me omg he’s lovely.”
His granddaughter replied: “He is very lovely. Don’t get attached to him. He might have to die.”
The following day, the pair returned to the Craigmore home and failed in their attempt to rob him.
In early August, Dwyer again made the journey to Adelaide — this time with Burns.
Mr Whitwell started to show his granddaughter some photos of her and her brother as children and Dwyer decided she couldn’t go through with killing him.
She sent a text message to Burns saying she was pulling out.





Bernadette Burns was received a minimum of 13.5 years jail.

But Burns talked her out of it, saying her mother would know she’d visited her grandfather if she didn’t go through with it and that she needed to “harden up”.
As Mr Whitwell walked his granddaughter to the front door, she stabbed him in the neck, before he turned around and placed his hands on her shoulders.
She then stabbed him in the chest and again in the neck.
Bleeding profusely, Mr Whitwell asked his granddaughter why she had attacked him. She did not respond. He then walked to the kitchen and grabbed a band-aid.
Incredibly, Dwyer helped him apply the band-aid and handed him a cloth before she started washing the dishes as he passed away.
His body was discovered three days later and the killers were arrested on August 26.





Robert Whitwell with Brittney Dwyer

In July, the court dismissed allegations made by Dwyer that her grandfather may have sexually molested her as a child.
The month before, Mr Whitwell’s brother Geoffrey Whitwell spoke of his family’s devastation at comforting Dwyer in the days after the death, before discovering his own granddaughter had killed him.
Holmes was given a 17-month suspended sentence for trespassing at Mr Whitwell’s home in April.
Originally published as Pure evil: Dwyer gets 21 years for killing her grandad